Visiting the Eden Project with toddlers

You can’t visit Cornwall without dropping by the Eden Project, it’s one of the most impressive places to see in Britain. 

I often get daunted about visiting big tourist places with my kids, as I worry about whether we will get around easily and if they will cope with all that’s going on. So I thought I would share the details of our family trip to the Eden Project to give parents of little ones an idea of what it’s like to visit with the kids. 

How much is it?

Tickets cost £27.50 per adult on the day, but can be purchased in advance on the website for £25. 

Children under four can visit for free, but once they hit their fifth birthday its £14 for 5-16 year olds. 

It’s certainly NOT a cheap day out and if you do end up buying food and souvenirs, you’re going to end up spending quite a lot. However, the site is so well cared for and thoughtfully presented that I was still happy to pay the price, expensive as it was!

What to bring

Accessibility to the biomes and inside the biomes is buggy friendly. There are not many places of this scale that you can say that about!

Definitely bring your buggy because there is a lot of walking involved and little legs are likely to get tired. 

Bring plenty of water too, as the rainforest biome is very hot and you will need to keep hydrated. 

Wear layers so that you can peel off hoodies and long sleeves once you’re inside. The temperature inside the rainforest biome was around 26.6C when we visited, but it felt way hotter due to the humidity. 

Bring your own snacks too, but there are several restaurants and cafes to pick up food from. 

What is there to see?

A lot! Once you leave the visitor centre and reception, you can see down the valley to the biomes from a viewing platform. It’s a stunning view and you should take a few minutes to take it in once you arrive. 

The walk down to the biomes is very pretty (and buggy friendly). Once you’re outside the biomes there are lots of pretty flowers, a giant bee plus there’s a stage area often used for events. At Christmas time there is an ice rink installed. 

There are two biomes. The rainforest biome is full of exotic and fascinating plants, as well as a few animals (try to spot them!). There are installations along the way to explain facts about the rainforest, from the environment to the trade, products and people who rely on it.

I think older children probably get more out of the interactive displays than my two, who are still a bit young to really take on board what they are learning about. They loved the higher walkway, which includes a rope bridge my three-year-old insisted on  doing twice.

There is a high viewing platform at the top of the biome but you need a climb a lot of steps to get to that so probably not one for little kids. 

The mediterranean biome is a lot cooler and features nice places to sit and relax, a wooden tractor the kids loved sitting on and more stunning displays of plants and flowers. We had lunch in the restaurant there, the pizzas were amazing!

The Invisible Worlds exhibition is in a separate building. It aims to explain the hidden elements of our world. Although my two were a bit young to get the meaning behind all of the exhibits, I think they really got something out of the tour. 

What facilities are there?

There are plenty of choices for where to eat and they are spread out over the site quite conveniently. 

There’s a restaurant in the mediterranean biome serving pizza and paella, plus another in the middle of the two biomes with a lovely selection of hot meals and cold snacks. 

At the main entrance there is another cafe, plus a lovely gift shop selling plants, toys and household items. 

There are toilets in the building between the two biomes and up at the main reception. 

My verdict

The cost may be a little eye-watering, but it is a beautiful place to visit and you can easily spend an entire day here. 

Bringing toddlers here is totally fine. It’s a very relaxed atmosphere, the walkways are easy to get around with a buggy and it’s all very much geared up for kids. 

My 18-month-old was certainly too young to really understand what we were seeing, but I think she took a lot away from the colours, smells and sounds we experienced. 

This is a lovely day out and I thoroughly recommend it if you’re visiting Cornwall!

For more ideas on what to do in Cornwall, check out this blog post about out holiday. 

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